The Multi-Disciplinary Practice Giving Discarded Materials a Second Chance

Melbourne-based Revival Projects is shaping the future of circular building practices.

Article by T Australia

Revival Projects2023 Visionary Award winner for Architecture and Design, Revival Projects. Photography by Tom Graham.

Robbie Neville, the founder of the Melbourne-based multidisciplinary practice Revival Projects, believes in second chances. His company, which he established in 2016 and is anchored by an unwavering commitment to sustainability, salvages construction materials and uses them to shape new developments.

“This is the future of circular building practices,” says the awards judge and Indigenous design expert Beau de Belle, who describes Neville’s business as “a truly sustainable manifestation of the intersection of architecture, building and design”.

Revival acts as an industry middleman, shortening the distance between builders, contractors and reclaimed goods, and also highlighting the aesthetic appeal of previously used materials. Neville has assembled a team of designers, builders, furniture makers and structural engineers to bring his vision of a circular economy to life across commercial and residential architecture projects.

Revival Projects' Robbie Neville. Photography by Michelle Tran.

Last year, his company transformed an industrial warehouse scheduled for demolition into the Zero Footprint Repurposing hub, a free space devoted to the storage and reuse of materials from demolished buildings. It also launched its own app, Revival Cooperative, a community-centred platform where users can redistribute or source materials that would otherwise be destined for landfill.

“This is an exciting nexus of digital technology and physical materials, creating a zero footprint,” says de Belle. “Revival Cooperative is an exemplar for a new digital cataloguing of salvaged building materials.

Designed to Disappear: Biode’s Vision for Greener Beauty

Vanessa Gray Lyndon, founder of 2023 Visionary Award winner Biode, talks to T Australia about the brand’s genesis and only using product’s you’d also eat.

Article by T Australia

Biode_Home_Compostable_4_1024x10242023 Visionary Awards winner Biode. Photography courtesy of Biode.

Lip balms by the Sydney brand Biode are slim enough to fit discreetly into the pocket of your jeans or trousers. Should you add said pants to your next wash cycle without checking the pockets, you’ll never see the lip balm again. It’s not caught in the machine mechanism — it has dissolved. Balm and packaging: gone.

Creating products designed to disappear is a risky business move, but for Biode’s founder, the natural and organic skincare formulator and manufacturer Vanessa Gray Lyndon, it is non negotiable.

“You should never put anything on your skin you wouldn’t eat,” she says. “And when we talk about the layers of the body, it’s also the layers of the earth, and that whatever we are putting on our skin can be absorbed. Our packaging should also be able to be absorbed by our environment.”

The founder of Biode, Vanessa Gray Lyndon. Photography courtesy of Biode.

After years of research and development and establishing a successful eponymous skincare line, Gray Lyndon launched the range of minimalist cruelty-free body and lifestyle products in 2020. The line includes deodorants, hand and body soaps and balms, each formulated from 100 per cent natural and organic ingredients and packaged in 100 per cent home-compostable casings.

“That was a lot of the testing that we did at the beginning: watching it compost,” says Gray Lyndon. “If you soak it in some boiling water you instantly see the vegetable inks coming off the packaging colour, and within 15 minutes it has swelled and is super soft. And then you just pour off the water and put it in the compost and it’s gone.”

“It’s clever and it looks beautiful,” says the awards judge and skincare entrepreneur Emma Lewisham. “Beauty is a space where people care about how things look, and to create a product that not only harnesses natural, non-toxic ingredients, but also has aesthetic appeal is impressive.”

Meet the 2023 Visionary Awards Technology Winner: Mineral Carbon International

The Australian company turning CO2 into value.

Article by T Australia

MCi Carbon_1Mineral Carbonation International's chief operating officer (and the company’s first employee) Sophia Hamblin Wang. Photography courtesy of MCi Carbon.

The business mission of Mineral Carbonation International (MCi) sounds deceptively simple: to transform CO2 into useful materials for daily life. In practice, the Australian company uses an innovative chemical engineering process to turn carbon dioxide from sectors such as the steel and cement industries (where emissions are hard to abate) into building materials like cement and plasterboard, alongside other low-carbon inputs for the circular economy.

It’s a process that usually takes millions of years. But at its Newcastle headquarters MCi has reduced it to minutes. “It’s just basically accelerating the earth’s way of storing CO2 and then turning it into value,” says the chief operating officer (and the company’s first employee) Sophia Hamblin Wang.

The Visionary Awards judge Amanda McKenzie says: “MCi is leading the way for innovative climate solutions that not only focus on reducing carbon dioxide pollution, but also use their technology to support other industries in the green transition.

“MCi has proven it’s in it for the long haul,” she continues, “and shows how solutions to climate change can have widespread benefits, which brings others along on the path to a cleaner future.”

The company is about to put shovels in the ground to create a demonstration plant in Newcastle, New South Wales, that aims to lock away between 2,000 and 3,000 tonnes of CO2 per annum. “It will be one of the largest [demonstration plants] and the first of its kind in the world,” says Hamblin Wang. “And it will really cement MCi and Australian technology as being one of the world leaders in mineral carbonation, so that is extremely exciting.”

Meet 2023 Visionary Awards judge Samantha Johnson

Polestar Australia’s managing director talks to T Australia about the inaugural Visionary Awards and what sustainability means to her.

Article by T Australia

Sam Johnson_12023 Visionary Awards judge Samantha Johnson, captured on site at Example House. Photography by Tom Roberts.

To select the winners of the #2023VisionaryAwards, nine judges representing a cross-section of creative industries gathered together in Sydney in late 2022 for a roundtable deliberation. With only a few days to go until our official awards ceremony, it’s time you got to know them.

As Polestar Australia’s managing director, Samantha Johnson oversees the Swedish automotive company’s growing local footprint. She previously held a senior role at Volvo Cars and was the director of finance and retail operations at Harley-Davidson Australia and New Zealand.

We’ll let Samantha take it from here.

Meet 2023 Visionary Awards judge Matilda Brown

Actress, writer and director, and co-founder of The Good Farm Shop talks judging the 2023 Visionary Awards and what sustainability means to her.

Article by T Australia

Visionary Awards_Matilda Brown2023 Visionary Awards judge Matilda Brown, captured on site at Example House. Photography by Tom Roberts.

To select the winners of the #2023VisionaryAwards, nine judges representing a cross-section of creative industries gathered together in Sydney in late 2022 for a roundtable deliberation. With only three days to go until our official awards ceremony, it’s time you got to know them.

Matilda Brown is an AACTA Award-nominated actress, writer and director, as well as the co-founder of The Good Farm Shop, an online meal delivery service that uses pasture-raised meat sourced from from regenerative farms across New South Wales.

Stay tuned for more introductions in the coming days.

Meet 2023 Visionary Awards Judge Jonno Seidler

The freelance writer, creative consultant, and the former creative lead at self-described “nature company” Unyoked talks sustainability and this year’s nominees.

Article by T Australia

Jonno Seidler_Judge Video2023 Visionary Awards judges Jonno Seidler (left) and Matilda Brown, on site at Example House. Photography by Tom Roberts.

To select the winners of the #2023VisionaryAwards, nine judges representing a cross-section of creative industries gathered together in Sydney in late 2022 for a roundtable deliberation. With only three days to go until our official awards ceremony, it’s time you got to know them.

Jonno Seidler is a freelance writer, creative consultant, and the former creative lead at self-described “nature company” Unyoked.  In 2022 he released his debut memoir “It’s A Shame About Ray” through Allen and Unwin, and in November last year he lent his expertise to the #2023VisionaryAwards judging panel, and helped select the eight inaugural category winners.

We’ll let Seidler take it from here – stay tuned for more introductions in the coming days.