T Australia Issue #11 Out Now

T Australia’s “Journeys” issue – on newsstands now – is an ode to travel, escape and inspiration in all its forms.

Article by T Australia

T Australia issue 11, our “Journeys” issue, is on sale today. An ode to travel, escape and inspiration in all its forms, the issue takes readers to far flung locales and inside the minds of some of our favourite thinkers. 

On the cover is the formidable Ajla Tomljanović. In an interview with Victoria Pearson, the country’s top female tennis player spoke candidly about the highs and lows of a sport that continues to test her spirit, her mental health, playing the “villain” in Serena Williams’ Grand Slam swan song, and all she’s wishing for in the next decade. “No matter who retires, tennis goes on,” she says of the game that has shaped much of her life. “And that’s almost the cruellest part of the sport: the train doesn’t stop for anyone.”

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Ondeh ondeh (glutinous rice dumplings filled with gula melaka). Photography by Esther Choi.
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The villa’s restaurant terrace and traditional Italian garden at Passalacqua in Lake Como. Photography by Stefan Gifthale.

Also in this issue, the #2023VisionaryAwards and an interview with its inaugural disruptor of the year Joost Bakker (page 62) , author and activist Bri Lee takes a surprisingly moving road trip (page 28), and Ligaya Misha reflects on the ways in which a cultural identity be defined by its food (page 88).

Kate Hennessy travels to Greenland and discovers an Inuit population on the precipice of irreversible change (“Melting Point”),  Mark Harris writes about the evanescent, ever-evolving tributes to those we lost — and continue to lose (“We Were Here”) and Fred Siggins explores the tropical revival of the once obscure aperitif from Normandy, mistelle (“Mistelle, My Belle).

There’s fashion, interiors, timepieces and design – all told with T Australia’s signature voice. We hope you enjoy this very special issue.

T Australia #11 is available at newsagents nationally, and can be ordered online now, either as a single copy or as part of a subscription.

T Australia Issue #10 Out Now

T Australia’s “The Greats” issue – on newsstands now – is dedicated to artists and game changers shaping our creative landscape.

Article by T Australia

T Australia’s tenth issue celebrates “The Greats”: those living with ethics, legacy, purpose – committing spectacular acts of defiance and never, ever taking no for an answer.

Our cover story (page 66), written by Luke Benedictus, profiles one of the country’s most enigmatic and compelling sports personalities, Lance “Buddy” Franklin. He has grit, good looks and a golden boot – an irresistible combination in a country that adores a humble sporting hero. But as he transcends the football code that made his name, T Australia discovers that the man who kicked 1,000 goals has plenty more to achieve of his own.

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“Remnants”, a 2022 installation by the Sydney-based floral artist Amy Thai, incorporates a variety of mosses and mushrooms with white and pink hellebores, ivy and trailing vines, jasmine, maidenhair ferns, Oncidium orchids, pierises and viburnums, as well as a television from the 1960s. Photography by Victoria Zschommle.
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Duckie Thot wears Louis Vuitton top, pants and boots, louisvuitton.com. Photography by Max Doyle.

The rest of the issue is a vibrant exploration of grit and innovation, and always with a bit of magic. Our digital content director Victoria Pearson interviews 20-year-old pop icon Billie Eilish (page 82), columnist and activist Bri Lee asks what it takes to be great in the age of overexposure (“Too Much Information”), and Jen Nurick speaks with the singular musician and social advocate known as Jack River (“Play The Changes”). Stylist Virginia van Heythuysen styles Australian modelling sensation Nyadak “Duckie” Thot in a sculptural take on the season’s goddess look (page 72).

Lee Tulloch explores the idyllic – if vulnerable – archipelago of the Maldives (“Into The Blue”), Mariela Summerhays visits Louis Vuitton’s globe-spanning travelling exhibition, See LV (“Emotional Baggage”) and Fred Siggins turns his eye (and taste buds) to native rock oysters (“Shell Shucked”).

There’s fashion, interiors, timepieces and design – all told with T Australia’s signature voice. We hope you enjoy this very special issue.

T Australia #10 is available at newsagents nationally, and can be ordered online now, either as a single copy or as part of a subscription.

T Australia Issue #9 Out Now

T Australia’s ‘Yes’ issue – on newsstands now – is dedicated to artists and entrepreneurs who do things differently.

Article by T Australia

Inspired by the “quiet radicals”, T Australia’s ninth issue celebrates the visionaries turning odds into opportunities, trade dream jobs for financial risks and count their failures as blessings.

Our cover story (page 56), written by Jen Nurick, profiles six visionaries who’ve defied the doubters, including artist and creator of our cover, Vincent Fantauzzo, Great Wrap’s Julia and Jordy Kay, the co-founder and creative director of Park, Sam Davy, founder of Who Give’s A Crap, Simon Griffiths, and founder and CEO of Culture Amp, Didier Elzinga.

"The Memory Box", page 88 of Issue 9. Photography by Anthony Cotsifas.
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"Sweet Dreams", page 48. Photography by Victoria Zschommler.

The rest of the issue is a vibrant exploration of grit, resilience, and the Australians not taking ‘no’ for a final answer. Columnist and activist Bri Lee experiments with the consequences of saying yes, exploring the vulnerability of being seen for your truest form of self (“Sitting Target”), and Victoria Pearson speaks with a cohort of pioneers fighting for the wine industry’s future (“Glass Half Full”). Stylist Virginia van Heythuysen conjures the Wild West and a sugared confection of diamonds, sorbets and cookies (“Before The Sun Sets” and “Sweet Dreams”).

Tom Lazarus sits down with Conrad Sewel, as the musician reflects on his son, a dream band and a new album that mines the influences of his childhood (“Soul Searching”), Fred Siggins tries the minimal-waste cocktails bringing root-to-stem cooking principles to the bar top (“Not So Wasted”) and photographer Trent Davis Bailey captures a new take on corsages (“Say It With Flowers”).

There’s fashion, interiors, timepieces and design – all told with T Australia’s signature voice. We hope you enjoy this very special issue.

T Australia #9 is available at newsagents nationally, and can be ordered online now, either as a single copy or as part of a subscription.

T Australia Issue #8 Out Now

T Australia’s inaugural Culture issue – on newsstands now – looks at the regeneration of art in Australia and beyond.

Article by T Australia

T Australia Issue 8 Preview

Driven by the theme of “Renewal”, this edition – T Australia’s inaugural Culture issue – looks at the regeneration of art in Australia and beyond, as seen through the eyes of early career artists as well as established arts identities.

Our cover story reviews how, after the decimation of the past two years, the arts sector is cautiously welcoming back audiences. For the rising dance star Rhys Kosakowski, the hiatus set the stage for a celebration of unapologetic originality. Kosakowski is one of a kind and the true epitome of what T Australia is about; his positivity, curiosity and ability to pivot during challenging times shines through in the story and photographs (page 52), which was styled by Virginia van Heythuysen and shot by Levon Baird (“State of the Arts”).

The dancer and model Rhys Kosakowski wears Kourh jacket and pants, Sir. x Jordan Barrett shirt, Sarah & Sebastian rings, and Gucci boots, gucci.com. Artwork: “Thigh High and Safety Net”, painted on set by Harold David. Photography by Levon Baird.
The dancer and model Rhys Kosakowski wears Kourh jacket and pants, Sir. x Jordan Barrett shirt, Sarah & Sebastian rings, and Gucci boots, gucci.com. Artwork: “Thigh High and Safety Net”, painted on set by Harold David. Photography by Levon Baird.
Kosakowski wears Prada coat and Salvatore Ferragamo boots. Harold David (background) wears his own clothes. Photography by Levon Baird.

The rest of the issue is an equally arresting, lush visual creation with deeply layered tales of inspiration, ingenuity, reinvention and the strength of the human spirit. The author Kathy Lette reveals the private side of her close friend the acclaimed artist Cressida Campbell (“Portrait of an Artist”). Lee Tulloch profiles four Australian women at the vanguard of ceramics (“A Woman’s Work”). And we track down that very 2022 cultural player, the celebrity book stylist (“Searching for the Notorious Book Stylist”).

Michael Snyder chronicles the restoration of exquisitely painted churches that are stirring debate about Mexico’s colonial past (“Faded Glory”), and Bri Lee cautions how this return to what we call normalcy feels perilously close to burnout (“An Artificial Spring”). Fred Siggins tries port and sherry’s locally-produced counterparts (“Strong Showing”) and Zoë Lescaze pleads for contemporary artists to confront the need to address the climate crisis (“World on Fire”).

There’s fashion, travel, food and homewares – all told with T Australia’s signature voice. We hope you enjoy this very special issue.

T Australia #8 is available at newsagents nationally, and can be ordered online now, either as a single copy or as part of a subscription.

T Australia Issue #7 Out Now

In this edition of T Australia — our Structure issue — we set out to dismantle our subjects in order to study the sum of their parts.

Article by T Australia

T Australia Issue 7

For this edition of T Australia, our Structure issue, we set out to dismantle our subjects in order to study the sum of their parts. It’s a broad theme that takes us from Elsa Pataky’s strategies for work-life balance (“Elsa in Excelsis”) to the DNA of a cocktail, reduced to three essential components (“The Geometry of the Cocktail”). We examine the bond shared by watchmakers and architects (“Time + Place”), then abandon structure altogether in a fashion shoot defined by soft knits and fluid forms (“Soft Skills”).

Bri Lee considers the fragility of history and the political act of looking back (“Urban Legends”). Helen Hawkes presents the case for embracing chaos in a world determined to play it safe (“The Rewards of Risk”)– from Albert Camus to languishing. You can also find Divya Bala’s examination of the red camellia’s role in the clean beauty game (“The Flower of Youth”), Lee Tulloch’s review of corsetry (“The Corset Myth”), Lucy E Cousins’ profile on writer, rapper and artist Omar Musa (“At The Margins”) and Ligaya Mishan on the foods we imbue with divine status (“The Sacrifice”).

T Australia #7 is available at newsagents nationally, and can be ordered online now, either as a single copy or as part of a subscription.

T Australia Issue #6 Out Now

This edition of T Australia — our Artistry issue — is dedicated to all those whose creative mastery gives the rest of us hope and a sense of what could be.

Article by T Australia

T Australia Issue 6 Summary

There will always be those who view fashion, fiction and other arts as mere indulgences – we at T Australia disagree with them. Because without wonder, beauty and joy, what is left? The arts in their many guises have never been more important than they are right now, as they can help us process change and understand the world we live in. And so this edition of T Australia — our Artistry issue — is dedicated to all those whose creative mastery gives the rest of us hope and a sense of what could be.

There’s no doubt that we Australians can be tough on our artists — few bear the brunt more than those who dare to create public works, as Kate Hennessy uncovers in her feature “Ways of Seeing”. Perhaps that’s why we tend to punch above our weight overseas, as Grace O’Neill reports in “Golden Ticket”, a fascinating piece about designers who have made it big abroad.

Jeff Koons' original BMW Art Car, an M3 GT2. Photography by Silvano Ballone.
Jeff Koons' original BMW Art Car, an M3 GT2. Photography by Silvano Ballone.
In front of the living room's clay oven is a heated seating platform and, in the foreground, two works by artist Dahn Vo: "Small Daybead After Enzo Mari" (left, 2018) and "Untitled" (2021).

If there’s a common thread that weaves together each of the creators profiled in this issue, it’s conviction: it takes nerves of steel to encourage others to see the world as you see it. It’s true of our cover star, Emma Balfour, who’s been a fixture of the international runways for almost 30 years. In her own quiet way, Emma has redefined what it is to be beautiful. There’s also the ceramist Ramesh Mario Nithiyendran, who combines clay with smoke machines and dystopian soundscapes, asserting his place in the contemporary art scene. Not everyone is a fan — and that’s probably a good thing.

The artist Ramesh Mario Nithiyendran in his studio in Gladesville, Sydney. Photography by Jordan Turner.
The artist Ramesh Mario Nithiyendran in his studio in Gladesville, Sydney. Photography by Jordan Turner.

In this issue, the activist Bri Lee muses on the value of the arts, writing that while journalism keeps us informed about the war in Ukraine, it’s poets and composers who can help us to understand it. “Art about humans,” she writes, “helps me make sense of the selfishness and devastating greed.” You can also find Ligaya Mishan considering how red meat is linked to the West’s legacy of conquering (“The End of Beef”), Philip King examining the current wave of limited-edition cars (“Joy Ride”) and Diana Abu-Jager reflecting on the rediscovery of flowers in cocktails and tisanes (“A Glass Full of Flowers”).

T Australia #6 is available at newsagents nationally, and can be ordered online now, either as a single copy or as part of a subscription.